In 1979, when the minimum wage was $2.90, a hard-working student with a minimum-wage job could earn enough in one day (8.44 hours) to pay for one academic credit hour. If a standard course load for one semester consisted of maybe 12 credit hours, the semester’s tuition could be covered by just over two weeks of full-time minimum wage work—or a month of part-time work. A summer spent scooping ice cream or flipping burgers could pay for an MSU education. The cost of an MSU credit hour has multiplied since 1979. So has the federal minimum wage. But today, it takes 60 hours of minimum-wage work to pay off a single credit hour, which was priced at $428.75 for the fall semester.

silverletomi:

I wonder how long we’ll stay friends on Facebook.

tendads:

Tom Haverford going “Nooooo!”: A Supercut

selfrescuingprincesssociety:

Hannah Wormington (September 5, 1914 – May 31, 1994)

Hannah Wormington was an archaeologist known for her writings and fieldwork on southwestern and Paleo-Indians archaeology over a long career that lasted almost sixty years.

Marie Wormington was born in Denver, Colorado. As a young child she was able to spend most of her time with her mother and her maternal grandmother who had come to the United States from France. Being fluent in both English and French proved to be a useful asset the summer she went to France to start her archaeology career.

Wormington was the first woman to focus on anthropology for a Radcliff Ph. D., which she obtained in 1954. This was during the era in American archaeology when that there was a definite bias against women being included in some departments and in some parts of the country. While taking classes at Harvard for her Ph.D. she had a professor who requested that she sit outside the classroom to take notes.

Before obtaining her Ph.D., Wormington already had an accomplished career in anthropology, which began in 1935 after she graduated with her B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Denver. Her initial areas of interest were medicine and zoology, but changed to archaeology after taking a few classes taught by E. B. Renaud, whose focus was on the French Paleolithic. He supported the idea of Paleolithic stone tool technologies in the New World that were identical to other parts of the world. Renaud suggested traveling to France to do some research.

Wormington jump started her own career through the connections she made by contacting Dorothy Garrod as soon as she was in London. Garrod became a mentor to Wormington, and she put her in touch with some notable archaeologists working in Paris at the time, including Harper Pat Kelley and Henri Martin. While working alongside Kelley, Wormington was allowed to borrow artifacts found in Europe for data collection at the Denver Museum. Martin insisted that Wormington be a part of the Paleolithic excavations taking place at Dordogne, and Wormington spent her 21st birthday doing just that.

After returning home to her native Denver, she was hired on at the Colorado Museum of Natural History (known today as the Denver Museum of Natural History) in the anthropology department until it closed in 1968, thus her appointment as a curator spanned 33 years. Because of her background as one of the foremost authorities on the subject of Paleo Indian studies, the museum was able to establish a formidable reputation. While working at the museum and before obtaining her MA and Ph.D. Wormington wrote Ancient Man in North Americaas well as Prehistoric Indians of the South West.

In the same year she left the Denver museum (1968), Wormington was the first female archaeologist to be elected president of the Society for American Archaeology. She had previously held the title of vice president twice (1950–51, 1955–56).

She was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship in 1970, and in 1977 she was awarded an honorary doctor of letters from Colorado state university. In 1983, the Society of American Archaeology awarded her the Distinguished Service Award, being the first female archaeologist to receive the award.

Just two years later she was awarded the Colorado Archaeology Society C.T. Hurst award for her significant role in Colorado Archaeology. In 1988 she was once again awarded honorary doctor of letters degree from Colorado College, the same year she was appointed the curator emeritus of the Denver Museum of Natural History.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Marie_Wormington

I miss the Bay Area so much.

I miss the Bay Area so much.

yourtourhost:

relationship goals

yourtourhost:

relationship goals

mypubliclands:

Kicking off the week with beautiful shots of the BLM-managed White Mountains National Recreation Area in Alaska - by Bob WIck, BLM Wilderness Specialist.

The one-million-acre White Mountains National Recreation Area near Fairbanks, Alaska, offers stunning scenery, solitude, and outstanding opportunities for year-round recreation. 

Summer visitors to the White Mountains pan for gold, fish, hike and camp under Alaska’s ‘midnight sun.’ The Nome Creek Road provides access to two campgrounds, trails, and a departure point for float trips on Beaver Creek National Wild River. In winter, visitors travel by ski, snowshoe, dog team and snowmobile to enjoy the 12 public-use cabins and 250 miles of groomed trails that make the White Mountains one of Interior Alaska’s premier winter destinations.

CLICK HERE to learn more. 

prasejeebus:

The tea has been spilled and it’s scalding

prasejeebus:

The tea has been spilled and it’s scalding

talkdowntowhitepeople:

do you want to know something?? I always wondered what the hell kind of hairstyle the Ancient Egyptians were trying to portray with depictions like these

image

image

and this

image

until I did my hair this morning and 

oh

image

welp

image

you can take the noses off our statues but until you find a way to take Egypt out of Africa we’re still going to find ourselves

iluvsamcedes:

thatsomethingsomething:

Brad Pitt in Killing Them Softly.

Every damn frame is dripping with truth.

@